"

I found two explosive devices in my field. I know it is dangerous, but I had to move them or my family would starve!"

Farmer in Mindanao
Farmer showing where he found IEDs

Philippines

FSD teams survey UXO-impacted villages in remote parts of western Mindanao, provide explosive ordnance risk education directly, or by training MRE volunteers, assist to build the capacity of the local authorities and help facilitate the removal and destruction of explosive ordnance hazards.

Demining

Finding out where the UXO problem is through systematic non-technical survey, investigating accidents and maintaining this and other key information on a GIS database.  

Education

Warning communities of the dangers of explosive ordnance hazards, identifying risky behaviour and helping people to change their behaviour so that they might live safely in hazardous areas.

Clearance

Working with local authorities to facilitate UXO clearance to remove the problem permanently.

Capacity-building

Providing technical advice and support to local authorities to assist in planning and prioritisation of mine action tasks.

FSD teams survey UXO-impacted villages in remote western Mindanao, facilitate the removal and destruction of explosive hazards, provide technical support to the local authorities and provide explosive ordnance risk education to local communities. Since 1968, Central and South-western Mindanao has been the scene of fighting between Muslim independence activists and the Philippines government, with intermittent periods of peace and conflict.

Each period of conflict leaves behind a legacy of unexploded or abandoned explosive hazards, posing risks to civilians, displaced people and returnees. In 2005, the Office of the Presidential Advisor on the Peace Process (OPAPP) and the Committee for the Cessation of Hostilities (CCH) asked FSD to provide technical Mine Action assistance in support of the Peace Process with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). FSD was encouraged to develop a "joint" survey and clearance proposal in Muslim Mindanao working with staff from both sides of theconflict. FSD also provided risk education to independent international ceasefire monitors.

marking explosives in the jungle
farmer showing a remnant of war
fsd employee at an interview
fsd employee at an interview

Aside from the continuation of non-technical survey and risk education activities, FSD is now working with the Joint Normalisation Committee, formed of both Parties to the peace process; the central government and regional Bangsamoro authorities, and other stakeholders to advise on how to organise a sustainable, locally owned response to the explosive hazard problem. For some years this has been seen as including the formation of some form of Mine Action Centre (MAC) to oversee the work in Muslim Mindanao. The MAC will coordinate the work, and task operators to undertake mine action activities (survey, clearance, risk education, andvictims' assistance) and perhaps weapons and ammunition management as well.

Since its inception, FSD's programme in the Philippines has trained over 300 Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) volunteers, carried out over 3,300 Risk Education sessions reaching more than 250,000 beneficiaries. Over 500 villages have been surveyed, in which 234 explosive hazardous areas have been identified. Of these, 81 tasks have been cleared in joint Government of the Philippines-MILFUXO clearance operations. 231 UXO victims (91% are young males) have been reported and, where possible, FSD coordinates victims' assistance through organisations such as the ICRC and local NGOs.

FSD implements this programme in close cooperation with Association FSD France

Details of our activities

Download the brochure of our impact

Our Donor(s)

Stories and news from the field.

Discover all the stories
Arrow icon

Ukraine

Philippines

Iraq

Preventing accidents through social media

Read
Arrow icon

FSD's Programmes Locations:

A Global Map Showing FSD's Current and Past Missions

Our impact all around the world

A little girl, wearing a hijab, standing

So that she doesn't risk her life with every step.

“I was playing outside with some friends when one of them picked up a piece of metal lying on the floor. Suddenly there was an explosion. We all fell to the ground. I felt like I had been hit in the back. ” Sanita, 11 years old. 

Like Sanita, many children walk in areas contaminated with landmines and unexploded ordnance on a daily basis. Since 1997, FSD has worked tirelessly to locate and eliminate these dangerous legacies of war around the world, and to prevent accidents through awareness campaigns. FSD also remediated sites polluted by toxic waste, and supports peace and development in conflict-affected countries.

Together, we can act. Every donation, no matter how small, helps shape a safer future for those who have already suffered so much.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Once a month, you will receive news from the field, insights into our activities, and answers to your questions on landmine clearance.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
A happy family with a father holding a baby two girls playing around and the mother sitting aside

More live information from the field

Twitter iconFacebook iconInstagram iconLinkedIn IconYoutube icon