Our  Values

As a humanitarian not-for-profit NGO, FSD is independent, neutral and impartial in all its activities; this is underpinned by the shared core values of honesty, integrity and respect for people in all the work that FSD does and these values are the foundation of FSD’s principles.

A blackboard and a group of boys standing in a row

FSD is committed to upholding a number of cross-cutting issues in all its programmes.

These include equality in opportunities for all staff; respect of ethical and cultural practices; promotion of gender sensitive approaches to all our work and projects; protection of vulnerable people from exploitation and harm; sustainable development for long-term impacts with all projects; and protection of the environment.

Two men standing

We integrate all activities with local communities.

A man pointing at a green cropland and another man looking
5 deminers in the field and the women in the center similing

We adapt all our projects to fit with the local situation and cultures.

We conduct baseline assessments with local communities to understand their needs and identify focal points for communication.

4 men standing and a group of people sitting in the ground wearing colourful hijabs
A group of men and women sitting, the women all wearing hijabs, they are listening and talking notes

We train local people to clear landmines and increase local employment.

Our Promises

Charter and Principles

FSD’s actions are guided by a set of shared values and the principles of independence and impartiality.

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Gender, Diversity and Inclusion
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Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse
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Statutes
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Whistleblower Policy
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Code of Conduct  🇩🇪
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Code of Conduct  🇬🇧
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Code of Conduct 🇫🇷
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Code of Ethics
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Environmental Policy
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Stakeholder, Beneficiary and Social Management Policy
A little girl, wearing a hijab, standing

So that she doesn't risk her life with every step.

“I was playing outside with some friends when one of them picked up a piece of metal lying on the floor. Suddenly there was an explosion. We all fell to the ground. I felt like I had been hit in the back. ” Sanita, 11 years old. 

Like Sanita, many children walk in areas contaminated with landmines and unexploded ordnance on a daily basis. Since 1997, FSD has worked tirelessly to locate and eliminate these dangerous legacies of war around the world, and to prevent accidents through awareness campaigns. FSD also remediates sites polluted by toxic waste, and supports peace and development in conflict-affected countries.

Together, we can act. Every donation, no matter how small, helps shape a safer future for those who have already suffered so much.

Stories and news from the field.

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Ukraine

Deminers anecdotes

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A deminer on field

Ukraine

Deminers answer Sophie and Lise's questions

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A deminer on field

Iraq

What does an improvised mine look like?

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